Connecticut

via Christine Stuart of CT News Junkie:

The calculation doesn’t include the last day of open enrollment, but Access Health officials reported Thursday that enrollment was down 2.7% in 2020.

An estimated 106,376 Connecticut residents enrolled with either ConnectiCare or Anthem Health Plans. That’s fewer than the estimated 111,066 who signed up for coverage last year.

I'm not sure where she gets 2.7%...that's a 4.2% drop year over year. They tacked on another 200 or so per day over the final week or so...if you assume a small surge on the final day they might top out at 107K, which would be perhaps a 3.7% drop.

A few more useful data nuggets:

It was the fourth year in a row that there was a drop in customers qualifying for federal tax credits to off-set the cost of the monthly premiums. An estimated 69% of those who enrolled this year are eligible for a subsidy. That’s a drop from 78% in 2016.

An important reminder from AccessHealth CT...

Close To 20 Percent Of Access Health CT Customers Still Need To Submit Verification Documents To Stay Covered

  • Customers can scan and submit verification documents at Enrollment Fairs, via mail or online
  • Some AHCT customers will receive letters in the mail requesting specific documents to confirm information in their application.
  • Documents can be submitted online, at an Enrollment Fair where documents can be scanned and uploaded immediately or by mail. 
  • Failure to submit documents by the deadline can result in loss of coverage or financial help.

HARTFORD, Conn. (January 13, 2020)—Open Enrollment to sign up for a 2020 health insurance plan through Access Health CT (AHCT) ends at midnight on Wednesday, January 15, 2020. Connecticut residents can still enroll online, over the phone, or in-person at any of our Enrollment Fairs or five Enrollment Locations—and some might need to submit verification documents.

Just another quick update from AccessHealthCT:

As of today, their press release page states the following:

Stats as of December 20, 2019:

Qualified Health Plans (QHP):

  • Net Total QHP Enrollment: 104,799
  • 2020 OE Acquisition Summary: 22,026

...Medicaid: Completed applications/redeterminations processed through the integrated eligibility system: 44,950

That's as of today (?). They'll have to have added another 6,267 people to beat last year's total of 111,066.

Just another quick update from AccessHealthCT:

As of today, their press release page states the following:

Stats as of December 20, 2019:

Qualified Health Plans (QHP):

  • Net Total QHP Enrollment: 104,439
  • 2020 OE Acquisition Summary: 21,001

Overall Volume

  • Unique Website Visitors: 185,869
  • Calls Handled: 183,637

Medicaid: Completed applications/redeterminations processed through the integrated eligibility system: 40,496

This was as of 12/20. They'll have to have added another 6,627 people to beat last year's total of 111,066.

As a reminder, Access Health CT has extended their Open Enrollment deadline by a full month, to January 15th:

Access Health CT Extends 2020 Health Insurance Open Enrollment Period

Just another quick update from AccessHealthCT:

As of today, their press release page states the following:

Stats as of December 13, 2019:

Qualified Health Plans (QHP):

  • Net Total QHP Enrollment: 102,589
  • 2020 OE Acquisition Summary: 15,067

Overall Volume

  • Unique Website Visitors: 157,591
  • Calls Handled: 152,733

Medicaid: Completed applications/redeterminations processed through the integrated eligibility system: 35,231

This was as of 12/13, so it's missing the last 2 days of Open Enrollment signups. They would have to have added another 8,500 people in the final two days in order to beat last year's total of 111,066.

Just another quick update from AccessHealthCT:

This year, their press release page states the following:

Stats as of December 6, 2019:

Qualified Health Plans (QHP):

  • Net Total QHP Enrollment: 99,322
  • 2020 OE Acquisition Summary: 10,281

Overall Volume

  • Unique Website Visitors: 128,886
  • Calls Handled: 119,089

Medicaid: Completed applications/redeterminations processed through the integrated eligibility system: 29,692

I'm assuming this means that they've joined several other state exchanges and are front-loading their auto-renewals of everyone currently enrolled. I'm further assuming that of those 99,322 people, 10,281 of them are new enrollees. If so, that means they'll have to enroll just 11,744 more people over the next four weeks to beat last year's 111,066 total.

Over the past few years, more and more of the state-based exchanges have shifted from waiting until the end of Open Enrollment to officially report auto-renewals of existing enrollees...to going ahead and auto-renewing everyone up front, and then subtracting those current enrollees who actively cancel their renewals.

This has caused a bit of confusion, since the exchanges don't always make it clear who's being counted and when.

Case in point: Access Health CT, Connecticut's ACA exchange. Last year they reported 12,777 enrollees during the first two weeks of Open Enrollment...and also noted that there were another 85,000 existing enrollees who hadn't yet actively renewed their policies as of 11/18.

This year, their press release page states the following:

Qualified Health Plans (QHP):

  • Net Total QHP Enrollment: 98,131
  • 2020 OE Acquisition Summary: 7,344

Overall Volume

OK, this is a bit confusing. Over the past few years, more and more of the state-based exchanges have shifted from waiting until the end of Open Enrollment to officially report auto-renewals of existing enrollees...to going ahead and auto-renewing everyone up front, and then subtracting those current enrollees who actively cancel their renewals.

This has caused a bit of confusion, since the exchanges don't always make it clear who's being counted and when.

Case in point: Access Health CT, Connecticut's ACA exchange. Last year they reported 12,777 enrollees during the first two weeks of Open Enrollment...and also noted that there were another 85,000 existing enrollees who hadn't yet actively renewed their policies as of 11/18.

This year, their press release page states the following:

Qualified Health Plans (QHP):

  • Net Total QHP Enrollment: 96,810
  • 2020 OE Acquisition Summary: 3,947

Overall Volume

OK, this is a bit confusing. Over the past few years, more and more of the state-based exchanges have shifted from waiting until the end of Open Enrollment to officially report auto-renewals of existing enrollees...to going ahead and auto-renewing everyone up front, and then subtracting those current enrollees who actively cancel their renewals.

This has caused a bit of confusion, since the exchanges don't always make it clear who's being counted and when.

Case in point: Access Health CT, Connecticut's ACA exchange. Last year they reported 12,777 enrollees during the first two weeks of Open Enrollment...and also noted that there were another 85,000 existing enrollees who hadn't yet actively renewed their policies as of 11/18.

This year, their press release page states the following:

2020 Open Enrollment Results (Stats will be available starting Friday November 8, 2019 by 5pm EST)

Qualified Health Plans (QHP):

In mid-July, the Connecticut Insurance Dept. reported that average requested premium rates for 2020 averaged around a 7.8% increase on the Individual market and 12.0% on the Small Group market.

This weekend, they reported the approved 2020 rate changes for both markets...and have cut down the rate hikes significantly for most carriers (while raising them a bit on a few others):

Insurance Commissioner Issues Decisions For 2020 Health Insurance Rates

Insurance Commissioner Andrew N. Mais today announced the Department has made final decisions on health insurance rate filings for the 2020 coverage year. As a result of these decisions, Connecticut consumers are projected to save approximately $54 million.

MLR rebate payments for 2018 are being sent out to enrollees even as I type this. The data for 2018 MLR rebates won't be officially posted for another month or so, but I've managed to acquire it early, and after a lot of number-crunching the data, I've recompiled it into an easy-to-read format.

But that's not all! In addition to the actual 2018 MLR rebates, I've gone one step further and have taken an early crack at trying to figure out what 2019 MLR rebates might end up looking like next year (for the Individual Market only). In order to do this, I had to make several very large assumptions:

via the Connecticu Insurance Dept:

Health Insurance Rate filings for 2020

The Connecticut Insurance Department has posted the initial proposed health insurance rate filings for the 2020 individual and small group markets. There are 14 filings made by 10 health insurers for plans that currently cover about 242,000 people.

Two carriers – Anthem and ConnectiCare Benefits Inc. (CBI) – have filed rates for both individual and small group plans that will be marketed through Access Health CT, the state-sponsored health insurance exchange.

The 2020 rate proposals for the individual market are on average lower than last year while the small group market is on average slightly higher than last year.

Politically, it's generally better to underpromise and overdeliver. Unfortunately, when it comes to the actual legislative process it's usually the other way around.

Case in point: Connecticut.

It was just twelve days ago that Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont rolled out his proposed ACA improvement policy package, which included a bunch of key elements including the ballyhooed "Connecticut Option"...a Public Option which would have opened up the existing state employee healthcare plan to anyone on the individual or small group markets.

The full suite was supposed to include nine major provisions:

Welp. That didn't take long...just a week ago, Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont announced that he and the state legislative leaders had put together a robust package of impressive healthcare reform bills, including:

  • expanding subsidies to at least some of those eanring more than 400% of the Federal Poverty Level (like California is in the process of doing)
  • expanding Medicaid up to 170% FPL (it used to be 201% FPL but was dropped down to 155% a couple of years ago)
  • reinstating the ACA's individual mandate penalty (similar to what Massachusetts, New Jersey and DC have done and what California is in the process of doing)
  • implementing a state-level reinsurance program (as over a half-dozen states, including several GOP-controlled ones, have done)

Last October, shortly before the midterm election, Democratic gubernatorial nominee Ned Lamont of Connecticut announced that if elected, he'd push hard for a robust reinsurance program along the lines of other states which have successfully implemented reinsurance 1332 waivers under the ACA:

HARTFORD, CT — Democratic gubernatorial candidate Ned Lamont has much lower expectations for what he’s going to be able to do to improve the health of Connecticut residents than one might expect from a Democratic candidate this year.

Sounds like Lamont would not push for CT to reinstate the ACA individual mandate penalty:

...Does he believe everyone in Connecticut has to purchase health insurance now that it’s not mandated by the federal government?

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